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What to do with old fishing nets: Just ask VisionDirect

If there’s one thing the world makes too much of, it’s plastic stuff. Smart phones, milk bottles, coffee cups and fishing nets – the list goes on – but the way we are now doesn’t need to be the way we’ll be.

There are organisations out there, like VisionDirect, who’re putting their weight behind the world’s new efforts to collect the stuff we’ve been gathering inadvertently for tens of years, for good.

A new initiative by the leading eyewear and glasses retailer is seeing some good steps being taken in the way of environmental action. They’ve recently teamed up with The World Wide Fund for Nature-Australia which in 2018, raised thousands of supporter donations that helped WWF-Australia buy and retire the licence for the last commercial gill net operating full-time in the northern Great Barrier Reef.

Once they secured the netting, they were left with a big question mark over what to do with it, which is where VisionDirect comes in.

The two organisations, by sharing the goal of making a difference in ocean plastics led to the concept of “ReefCycle sunglasses”, a new initiative by VisionDirect and WWF.

VisionDirect CEO David Menning said upcycling old nets is another way to give back to the community, following on from the company’s program to donate eyeglasses in less fortunate nations.

The WWF & Arise Collective ReefCycle sunglasses go on sale on July 4 at (websites). They will cost $89 for regular, $139 for polarised, and a prescription option will be available.

The first 1,000 pairs sold are a limited edition – embossed with a marine animal whose future depends on a Net Free North. People purchasing ReefCycle sunglasses will help protect local marine life with 50% of the proceeds going back to WWF for conservation work like advocacy for a #NetFreeNorth.

See more at the VisionDirect website.

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