British Library: Exhibition on our most impressive skill – writing

Think about it: Where would we be without the ability to write (and read) words?

This article wouldn’t exist. You can forget about anything computer-related, in fact. If you’re a holidaymaker, too, good luck navigating anywhere in the world without knowing which road you’re standing on. Oh, and that menu at your favourite restaurant can go out the window; you’ll get what you’re given. Assuming the chef can even cook anything without a recipe to follow.

Writing Exhibition at the British Library from 26th April – 27th August 2019

The British Library in London is a huge proponent of writing – duh – and this season until 27 August, has a seriously incredible exhibition in homage to it: Writing: Making Your Mark.

For over 2,500 years now, writing and humans’ ability to do so has shaped the world and contributed to every element of it.

The earliest examples of semiotics and writing was found in the Mesoamerican region by the Mayans and it’s thought to have recorded dates.

From then, it’s been a pretty steep and slow-burning learning curve as symbols, etchings, carvings and engravings made their way across the world on all manner of mediums.

Writing Exhibition at the British Library from 26th April – 27th August 2019

Long before paper, there was stone, then clay, then papyrus before the world of paper made its debut in around 206BC and the world started hacking down over 4 billion trees a year for its production. Here’s hoping the next learning curve takes us to more sustainable means.

The Writing: Making Your Mark exhibition explores the history of writing in deep details, from early days, right up to the modern, answering questions about the etymology of pens and pencils, fonts and typefaces, word processing and what the future might hold for the humble alphabet and written word.

If you’re in London and know how to write, missing this would be an insult to your own intelligence. Find out more at the British Library’s website.

Writing Exhibition at the British Library from 26th April – 27th August 2019

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