The Wuliangye 2016 Annual Sydney Gala

Wuliangye is the latest alcoholic addition to the Australian market you’ll be glad you’ve head of.

Pronounced woo-lee-yang-yey, this Chinese spirit has been around for longer than Australia’s been colonised and then some – with its formula believed to have stem from the Ming Dynasty (1368–1644). It’s rooted in history, cultural significance and has existed in its current form – though now a lot more refined – since around 1905, meaning the Chinese have a special place in their heart for the spirit they’re now willing to share with the Australian market.

wuliangye-bottle

It looks like vodka, but is significantly more potent at over 50% alcohol per bottle and its taste is so unique, you’d be hard done by mixing it into a cocktail with anything other than softly acidic ‘soapberry’ fruits like lychee and rambutan, both natives of China and Asia.

The spirit is to be drunk as a standalone for the flavour and the rich ease with which is doesn’t burn your throat out like much cheaper Western interpretations of white spirits like vodka.

wuliangye-dancer

Wuliangye has been perfectly crafted using five ingredients, which is represented in the name itself, translating into “five grains liquid”consisting of millet, maize, glutenous rice, long grain rice and maize. The ingredients themselves render the spirit a more full of body spirit with a unique flavour and unique aftertaste that takes some getting used to, that is actually quite morish.

Wuliangye is available at Dan Murphy’s nationally in 500mL bottles for $222.99. Give it a try.

Wuliangye launched to the Australian market very recently with a specially catered Sydney launch. Below are some images from the cultural homage.

wuliangye

wuliangye-gala-dinner

 

 

 

James

 

 

 

James Banham
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James Banham

Editor at THE F
James Banham is an Australian lifestyle, fashion and entertainment journalist. His writing can be found on these many topics and more in print and online publications around the country.
James Banham
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